Anise Chicken

This is a very tasty Chinese dish that my chinese ayi taught me a long time ago back in Shanghai.

And I always cook it for our Chinese New Years celebrations.

You need the following:

4 chicken filets, cut into small pieces

4 table spoons cornstarch

8 Star anise

2 egg whites

Soy sauce

Salt

1, You mix the egg whites with the cornstarch and anise.

2, And then you add the chicken to it.

3, Wait for some minutes, then put it into the wook and cover with water.

4,Let it simmer for some minutes.

5, Then wash it in a drainer.

6, Next, add oil to the wook and fry it all for 2 minutes.

7,Add some water, and 5-6 tablespoons of soy sauce.

And some salt, not to much!

And a spoon if sugar!

Let it simmer for around 5 minutes.

Done!

Serve with some noodles, or just eat it as it is.

Din Tai Fung

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This Taiwanese/Chinese restaurant is addictive! We went for some of my favourites, tossed wild vegetable and beancurd with sesame oil, string bean with minced pork and mini dry shrimps, steamed chicken dumplings, steamed vegetarian dumplings and spicy wontons.

Interesting facts; Founder Yang Bingyi was born in Shanxi, China. But he moved to Taiwan in 1948 as a result of the Chinese Civil War. He worked for 2 different cooking oil retailers, until he started his own cooking oil shop with his wife in 1958. The name was a combination of his previous employer’s company name Heng Tai Fung and his new supplier’s company name DinMei Oils. Din Tai Fung was founded. 1970 business became slow. So they turned over half the shop to making and selling steamed buns (Xiaolongbao) by hiring chefs from Shanghai where the Xiaolongbao is originally from. The buns and noodles were so popular that the store stopped selling oil and became a restaurant in 1972. The original restaurant is located on Xinyi Road in Taipei. In an article published on January 17, 1993, the New York Times rated Din Tai Fung as one of the top ten gourmet restaurants in the world (Din Tai Fung was the only Chinese or Taiwanese restaurant to receive this accolade).
Further international recognition came in 2010, when Din Tai Fung’s Hong Kong Branch was awarded one Michelin Star; a first for a restaurant from Taiwan.
Today, Din Tai Fung has branches in Japan, the United States, South Korea, Singapore, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, and Thailand.

 

Locations;

http://www.dintaifung.com.cn

Welcome!!

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This is in our main hallway. And everything is pretty Chinese here I just noticed… The old altar table was bought outside Shanghai a really long time ago. And the Buddha we dragged home from the antique market in Shanghai in 2002. Funnily enough it was my husband that wanted this first Buddha of ours! Now he says that we have to many. The old basket is a basket that someone got for their wedding long time ago, I will show you what it looks like inside another day. The pots under neath the table are from our old local market in Shanghai. They had alcohol in them before. And I bought them when they were empty.  You can move the woman to Sweden, but she still have her Chinese home;)