Chinese New Year

So it is now the year of the pig. We celebrate the Chinese New Year every year with a nice dinner at our house.

Photo Malin Nordblom

I am not chinese, but my daughter is. And I lived there for nearly 7 years. So that’s why;)

This year I made 6 different dishes, and it took me a day to prepare. Chinese food is all about cutting it all into little pieces and mixing it with ginger, Chili and garlic. And other little things;)

I will add lot’s of recipes at the blog.

So what should you drink with the food?

This year I had the best paired wine with the food ever. Two different kinds of Stoneleigh from New Zealand.

I actually preferred the Chardonnay with the food. It was a perfect match! But my husband liked the other one better. I will stock up with the Stoneleigh Latitude Chardonnay because it’s the best wine I ever had with the Chinese food. And I have 16 years of experience of chinese food and wine;)

The food I make is just a little bit spicy, the Shanghai style of cooking. I did make a Sichuan dish too, and I still loved the Chardonnay with it. The wine is very rich and well just buy it, trust me!

The Wild Valley Sauvignon Blanc was a good one too, but more on the sweet side. I had this one with fish the other night and it was perfect!

So just stay updated on my blog, and I will give you all those recipes to go with the wine!

Enjoy!!

Gong Xi Fa Cai🎋

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Anise Chicken

This is a very tasty Chinese dish that my chinese ayi taught me a long time ago back in Shanghai.

And I always cook it for our Chinese New Years celebrations.

You need the following:

4 chicken filets, cut into small pieces

4 table spoons cornstarch

8 Star anise

2 egg whites

Soy sauce

Salt

1, You mix the egg whites with the cornstarch and anise.

2, And then you add the chicken to it.

3, Wait for some minutes, then put it into the wook and cover with water.

4,Let it simmer for some minutes.

5, Then wash it in a drainer.

6, Next, add oil to the wook and fry it all for 2 minutes.

7,Add some water, and 5-6 tablespoons of soy sauce.

And some salt, not to much!

And a spoon if sugar!

Let it simmer for around 5 minutes.

Done!

Serve with some noodles, or just eat it as it is.

Beef Broccoli

This is such an easy recipe, and jet it tastes so good!

INGRIDIENTS;

500 gram lean sirloin steak, thinly sliced

2-300 grams broccoli florets, and one sliced carrot

4 tbsp of Lee Kum Kee Premium Oyster Sauce

2 tbsp Cooking oil

Follow these steps;

Photo Malin Nordblom

1, Marinate the sirloin steak in 2 tbsp of Oyster Sauce

2, Blanch the broccoli and carrot for 2 minutes, and then drain it. (Blanch, boil 2 minutes and then rinse with cold water quickly and then drain it)

3, Stir fry the beef for 2 minutes

4, Add the vegetables and 2 tbsp of Oyster Sauce and let it cook for 2 minutes.

5, Serve with rice or noodles.

Photo Malin Nordblom

Gong Bao Ji Ding

Or The English name, Kung Pao Chicken. Kung Pao Chicken is one of my favourite dishes from China, and when you cook it make a lot, because it is hard to stop eating;)

It’s a Sichuan dish. The name comes from Ding Baozhen that was called Kung Pao. He used to serve this dish, and people started to call the dish after him.

Ingredients;

900 grams (2 pounds) of chicken breasts, or legs. Cut into small cubes.

2,2 dl (1 cup) of fried peanuts

4 spring onions, the white part. Cut it into small bits.

8 dried chilli peppers ( or as many as you want, it’s according to your taste.

Cooking oil

2 teaspoons Sichuan pepper

A pinch of salt

!!!If you are using Sichuan peppercorn powder, add it along with the deep-fried peanuts.

When frying the Sichuan peppercorn, use low heat and be patient. Over-fried Sichuan peppercorn brings a bitter taste!! Ok?!?

Marinating

a small pinch of salt

4 tsp. dark soy sauce (for coloring)

2 tbsp. Rice wine

4 tsp. cornstarch

The Mixed Sauce

1tablespoon dark soy sauce

2 tablespoons of light soy sauce

a small pinch of salt (around 1/2 tsp.)

5 centimetres (2 inch) of grated ginger

2 tablespoons chopped green onion

4 garlic cloves, finely chopped

4 tsp.cornstarch

2 tablespoon vinegar

4 tablespoons water

3-4 teaspoons of sugar

Cut the chicken into little square bits. Transfer the chicken to a large bowl and marine it with salt, soy sauce, cooking wine and cornstarch.  

Cut the spring onion into thin slices, and slice the ginger and garlic.

Heat up the oil in the wok until hot, add the chicken cubes. Fry until all of the chicken cubes begin to change color.

Transfer the chicken cubes to a plate for a while. Add Sichuan peppercorn and dried chili pepper, and fry until aromatic. Add the garlic, ginger and half of the scallions. Quickly fry to mix well.

Add the chicken again.

Stir the sauce, and then pour it in and mix with the chicken in the wok.

Fry until the sauce is well coated. Mix with the remaining leek onion white sections and fried peanuts. Finished!

Serve with rice.

I used Chili flakes in this one. Because my daughter doesn’t think it’s spicy then;)

Din Tai Fung

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This Taiwanese/Chinese restaurant is addictive! We went for some of my favourites, tossed wild vegetable and beancurd with sesame oil, string bean with minced pork and mini dry shrimps, steamed chicken dumplings, steamed vegetarian dumplings and spicy wontons.

Interesting facts; Founder Yang Bingyi was born in Shanxi, China. But he moved to Taiwan in 1948 as a result of the Chinese Civil War. He worked for 2 different cooking oil retailers, until he started his own cooking oil shop with his wife in 1958. The name was a combination of his previous employer’s company name Heng Tai Fung and his new supplier’s company name DinMei Oils. Din Tai Fung was founded. 1970 business became slow. So they turned over half the shop to making and selling steamed buns (Xiaolongbao) by hiring chefs from Shanghai where the Xiaolongbao is originally from. The buns and noodles were so popular that the store stopped selling oil and became a restaurant in 1972. The original restaurant is located on Xinyi Road in Taipei. In an article published on January 17, 1993, the New York Times rated Din Tai Fung as one of the top ten gourmet restaurants in the world (Din Tai Fung was the only Chinese or Taiwanese restaurant to receive this accolade).
Further international recognition came in 2010, when Din Tai Fung’s Hong Kong Branch was awarded one Michelin Star; a first for a restaurant from Taiwan.
Today, Din Tai Fung has branches in Japan, the United States, South Korea, Singapore, China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Australia, and Thailand.

 

Happy Chinese New Year!

We were invited for a Chinese New Year dinner today. And Teresa had cooked so much food. And it all tasted fantastic!

And the year of the dog will hopefully be a good one, because we had so much lucky food.

The fish for prosperity

The lion’s head refers to the meatballs and the cabbage represents the mane. A lion represents strength and the roundness of the meatball represents family, togetherness

Spring rolls  are meant to symbolize bars of gold, and bring wealth and prosperity in the year to come.

And there were more..

Hard Rock at Universal

So we stayed at Hard Rock. It was a really great place! They had thought about every detail here. And I’m used to nice Asian hotels. The only downer at our room was that there were no light in the ceiling, so it was very cosy all the time. Wich is ok most of the time. We had a nice dinner at the Kitchen at the hotel. I had the Chinese crispy chicken sallad. It was really good! And the breakfast was fantastic! And when you stay at Hard Rock, then a express card is included.